Associate Degrees in Computer Forensics / Cybercrime

Anytime someone commits a crime using a computer, they leave traces behind. An experienced computer forensics expert can detect where and when cybercrime has taken place and can help law enforcement track cybercriminals. As cybercrime continues to rise, the field of computer forensics has exploded. An associate degree in computer forensics / cybercrime teaches you to gather data that has been electronically stored or encrypted on digital media and using that data as evidence in a court case or as information to help law enforcement further an investigation. An associate degree in computer forensics / cybercrime is a two-year degree that qualifies you for an entry-level position in computer forensics / cybercrime or can be used as a steppingstone to a more advanced degree in computer forensics / cybercrime.

Associate Degree in Computer Forensics / Cybercrime Success Factors

Earning an associate degree in computer forensics / cybercrime requires that you have strong organizational ability, are very detailed and skilled in interpreting scientific results, possess a high mechanical aptitude and analytical thinking ability, display strong communication skills, and are able to work well with others.

Associate Degree in Computer Forensics / Cybercrime Curriculum

The courses you take when earning an associate degree in computer forensics / cybercrime includes statistics, economics, business, criminal law, computer systems and schools, cybercrime, legal basics, technical writing, algebra, public speaking, and intrusion detection systems.

Computer Forensics / Cybercrime Jobs

Most positions in computer forensics require advanced training or an advanced degree, yet an associate degree in computer forensics / cybercrime may qualify you for entry-level work in the field. The FBI currently projects that nearly fifty percent of its cases will require a computer forensics professional, which means the field is expected to expand for years to come. Computer forensics careers include computer forensics investigators, digital media analysts, and digital forensics detectives. Computer forensics experts are hired by law enforcement agencies, prosecutor's offices, and large corporations to handle increasing investigative needs. Law enforcement agencies use computer forensics to gather evidence and obtain information about a suspect or known criminal. Large corporations employ a computer forensics professional to monitor employees' computer activities or prevent rogue employees or contractors from leaking critical information.