Bachelor's Degrees in Computer Forensics / Cybercrime

An increasing percentage of crimes are being committed with computers and over the internet. In addition, many other traditional criminals leave evidence on home and work computers. As a result, the field of computer forensics and cybercrime has emerged to investigate crimes through computer data gathering. If you're interested in pursuing a career in cybercrime, a bachelor's degree in computer forensics / cybercrime is a good place to start. A bachelor's degree in computer forensics / cybercrime teaches you to gather data that has been electronically stored or encrypted on digital media and using that data as evidence in a court case or as information to help law enforcement further an investigation. A bachelor's degree in computer forensics / cybercrime is a four-year degree that qualifies you for entry-level to mid-level work in cybercrime and computer forensics or can be used as a steppingstone to a graduate degree in computer forensics / cybercrime.

Bachelor's Degree in Computer Forensics / Cybercrime Success Factors

Earning a bachelor's degree in computer forensics / cybercrime requires that you are very detailed and skilled in interpreting scientific results, possess a high mechanical aptitude and analytical thinking ability, have strong organizational ability, display strong communication skills, and are able to work well with others.

Bachelor's Degree in Computer Forensics / Cybercrime Curriculum

The courses you take when earning a bachelor's degree in computer forensics / cybercrime include business, criminal law, computer systems and schools, cybercrime, legal basics, technical writing, algebra, statistics, economics, public speaking, and intrusion detection systems.

Computer Forensics / Cybercrime Jobs

A bachelor's degree in computer forensics / cybercrime is typically the minimum educational requirement for work in the field of computer forensics and cybercrime. The FBI currently projects that nearly fifty percent of its cases will require a computer forensics professional, which means the field is expected to expand for years to come. Law enforcement agencies use computer forensics to gather evidence and obtain information about a suspect or known criminal. Large corporations employ a computer forensics professional to monitor employees' computer activities or prevent rogue employees or contractors from leaking critical information. Computer forensics careers include digital media analysts, computer forensics investigators, and digital forensics detectives. Computer forensics experts are hired by law enforcement agencies, prosecutor's offices, and large corporations to handle increasing investigative needs.