Bachelor's Degrees in Criminal Justice

The criminal justice system encompasses far more than mere judges and lawyers. With a Bachelor's Degree in criminal justice, myriad positions become available to you; it all depends on what you want to specialize in.

Bachelor's Degrees in Criminal Justice Specializations

A Bachelor's Degree in Criminal Justice allow you to specialize in a number of areas, including court reporter, forensic lab technician, fingerprint analyst, and DNA analyst.

Bachelor's Degrees in Criminal Justice Curriculum

The Bachelor's Degree in Criminal Justice Curriculum depends on your area of specialization. Typically, a court reporter only needs to be a good writer and be trained to operate the court recording device. You can often get a job without a Bachelor's Degree in criminal justice, just some sort of certification. On the plus side, this means you can take a few classes, get certified, get a job, and then work at toward your Bachelor's Degree in criminal justice while employed. A forensic pathologist learns to run various lab tests. Of course, this type of work does entail dealing with dead body as you perform an autopsy. DNA identification is used to both convict and free suspects, owing to the high level of accuracy in the field. With that in mind, you must be highly trained to conduct the test properly. There is also a sub-field of DNA analysis known as mitochondrial DNA analysis that is becoming equally important in criminal cases, so classes in this area are common.

Bachelor's Degrees in Criminal Justice Jobs

Depending on what sort of Bachelor's Degree in criminal justice you get, one or more of these jobs can be available to you. Before enrolling in any sort of college program, check what the educational requirements are in your area. You want to be sure you get the right Bachelor's Degree in criminal justice. Typical criminal justice jobs include court reporter, forensic lab technician, fingerprint analyst, and DNA analyst.