Economists say that for many, no college degree can mean no job

Economists believe that for people who do not have a college degree, finding a job can be extremely difficult.
Economists believe that for people who do not have a college degree, finding a job can be extremely difficult.

Economist and Rutgers University professor Bill Rodgers recently told NPR that unemployment is currently "bifurcated," or divided, because only individuals with college degrees are getting hired. This prediction is unfortunate for individuals like Valerie Young.

Young told the news provider that although she actively looked for a job for three years, she was consistently turned down by employers.

"Even though I have put in hundreds of applications and dozens and dozens of resumes, employers tell me in interviews that they are looking for someone with more education, a college degree or an associate's degree," she told NPR.

According to the news outlet, Young's story is becoming common.

Heidi Shierholtz, an economist at the Economic Policy Institute, said that while individuals who are struggling to find work with a college degree can accept jobs below their skill level and experience, people who do not have a degree frequently cannot find jobs at all.

According to a 2009 study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the unemployment rate for individuals with a bachelor's degree or higher was 4.6 percent. For people with only a high school diploma, this percentage jumped to 14.6.

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