Pursing higher education may improve a person's health

Students who pursue higher education may age slower than those who do not, according to a recent study.
Students who pursue higher education may age slower than those who do not, according to a recent study.

Individuals who decide to go back to school will have many advantages over those who only complete a high school diploma. For example, earning a degree can lead to an increased salary, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports.

While people who have only a high school diploma earn about $32,552 per year, a bachelor's degree can increase this salary to $53,300 annually, on average. A master's degree can further boost a person's paycheck to about $65,364 per year.

Earning a degree can do more for students than raise their salaries, however. It may also give them better health than those who decide not to go to college, according to a recent study by the British Heart Foundation, BBC News reports.

Researchers believe that individuals who earn higher education may be able to make better health decisions and find more appropriate ways to manage their stress.

Measuring the length of telomeres, or the DNA found at the end of chromosomes, these researchers also found that people who did not complete higher education also age faster than those who did, the news outlet reports.

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