States work to decrease the number of students who drop out of college

Many states are working to decrease the number of students who drop out of college before graduating.
Many states are working to decrease the number of students who drop out of college before graduating.

According to Complete College America, while many students are deciding to earn a bachelor's degree for its wide variety of benefits, states are struggling to get these individuals to complete this program entirely.

In Massachusetts, for example, 13 percent of students who are pursuing a degree at a two- or four-year institutions drop out after their freshman year. An additional 18 percent quit before graduation. Maine has similar results. Before sophomore year begins, about 16 percent of people decide to leave school, while 17 percent more quit before graduation.

College drop out rates are similar in states including Idaho, Oregon, Georgia and Pennsylvania.

In order to encourage more students to continue their pursuit of higher education, three community colleges in Maine have recently adopted the Accelerate ME program, according to The Republic.

With this program, individuals can earn an associate's degree in one year, which will cut down the high number of students who drop out after this time frame. People who wish to participate must be 21 years or older and must have at least 30 credits towards a 60-credit degree program.

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