Students save by going for three-year bachelor's programs

Students save by going for three-year bachelor's programs
Students save by going for three-year bachelor's programs

A growing number of colleges and universities are unveiling three-year programs, allowing students to earn a bachelor's degree without having to pay tuition for a fourth year of study, reports the Washington Post.

These programs offer a range of advantages over traditional degrees - they give students the chance to make better use of college credits earned during high school, they help families save money on the costs of attending school and they provide universities with a way to make use of classrooms that are often vacant during the summer and winter.

Some drawbacks exist, such as the fact that students are often not given a chance to change their majors, but students who know what they want to do and want to get it done quickly have much to gain.

"We have seen this outpouring of interest. What I hear from families is that they’re really hungry for a high-quality program that they can afford," said Margaret Drugovich, the president of a university that operates a three-year program with two dozen majors and as many as 87 students once the fall semester begins.

This ability to save money can come in handy for many. According to the National Center for Education, 66 percent of all undergraduate students received financial aid in the 2007-2008 academic year.

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