Alternative postsecondary options become more appealing

Alternative postsecondary options become more appealing
Alternative postsecondary options become more appealing

A growing number of students are opting for shorter postsecondary paths to a career over traditional four-year university degrees, reports Education Week.

The source states that while 70 percent of students take classes at a two- or four-year college within two years of finishing high school, just 40 percent of Americans have a bachelor's or associate's degree by the age of 27.

The remaining students who do not complete these degrees still have other options for a postsecondary education, including community college, career training and occupational certification. In addition to preparing people for a career, these choices can also act as a stepping stone to a bachelor's degree down the line.

In a report entitled "Beyond High School, Before Baccalaureate: Meaningful Alternatives to a Four-Year Degree," the Center on Education and the Workforce at Georgetown University lays out the ways in which some institutions around the country prepare students for these intermediate options.

These options can help students get ahead in the workplace - according to the U.S. Department of Labor, jobs requiring at least some postsecondary education will make up one-third of all employment growth between 2008 and 2018.

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