As more jobs require a degree, adults may want to consider online studying

For adults who want to find more job opportunities, earning a degree online may be more manageable than participating in classroom-based programs.
For adults who want to find more job opportunities, earning a degree online may be more manageable than participating in classroom-based programs.

According to a Harvard University report, the number of jobs that require higher education have increased dramatically since the 1970's.

The report shows that in 1973, about 72 percent of jobs required either a high school diploma or or less. By 2007, only 41 percent of positions could be filled by someone who does not have a college education. During this year, about 10 percent of jobs demanded an associate's, 21 percent required a bachelor's and 11 percent wanted candidates with a master's degree or higher.

Harvard officials believe that the opportunity gap between those who have no college education and those who hold a degree will only continue to get wider.

For adults who are struggling to find work, or those who want to advance their careers, online education may be a manageable option. Many students prefer studying online because it gives them a schedule that is flexible enough to balance other commitments, such as a family. These classes can also be more affordable than traditional campus-based programs.

According to the 2010 Sloan Survey of Online Learning, in the fall 2009 semester, approximately 5.6 million students were taking at least one web-based class.

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